Book Review: Bloom by Wil McCarthy

If you’ve ever encountered the concept of grey goo and “The Game of Life,” a computer model that uses something called cellular-automata along with simple rules and a grid system to generate interesting patterns you’ll understand the basis…

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Book Review: The Ship Who Sang by Anne McAffrey

The author Anne McAffrey is best known for her fantasy series The Dragonriders of Pern but she’s also a Hugo Award winning author of science fiction novels. Any enterprising science fiction enthusiast would find herself well-tread to pick…

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Book Review: Vast by Linda Nagata

The book Vast by Linda Nagata is the culmination of a trilogy that follows a small group of characters through the trials of outliving their own cultural heritage and how their technology has transcended their own humanity. As…

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Book Review: Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld

Steampunk is a much-overlooked literary form of science fiction that many science fiction fans find themselves drawn into. It’s often presented as a look at what-might-have-been through the eyes of technological progress if Tesla and Volt had instead…

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Book Review: Hyperion by Dan Simmons

Some science fiction not only speaks to the effect of technology on people, but also the epic sweep of character and the overall character of humanity in the face of the unknown. In this way, Dan Simmons’s Hyperion…

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Book Review: Glasshouse by Charles Stross

When it comes to the science fiction genre, Glasshouse initially struck me as a little bit of an oddity. At it’s core, it’s a powerful self-examination of society style of speculative fiction with deep science fiction elements; but…

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Book Review: Halting State by Charles Stross

Video games stand out as possibly the best model for UI design and how virtual reality will function in the future—point-in-fact, the entire MMO community shows us that virtual worlds are already a reality and that they can…

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